Saturday, January 21, 2012

cookies, tea, and recipes

I have made great progress on my Minoru jacket but I am now waiting on the sewalong to catch up to me.  I am not using the hood, so I am a few steps ahead.  In the meantime, I've been working on a tunic using a tribal print in metallic bronze and earth tones.  It is really pretty and VERY see-through, but I'm not teaching school anymore so I'm going for a seductive vibe.

I also have a plain, raglan sleeve, drop waist dress cut out and ready to sew.  It is grey, and decidedly not seductive but I may hem it a bit high  :-)  and wear some heels.

Finally, I've been cooking, baking, and organizing some new recipes.  Yesterday I made Molasses Crinkles-does anyone else remember making these in HomeEc?  They are delicious, and go great with Earl Grey tea.

recipe from Epicurious

Here is an alternate recipe which I copied from the 3x5 card from my 7th grade HomeEc file (yes, I still have some of them, including Strawberry Bavarian Cream).


Molasses crinkles

 ¾    cup shortening (I used 1/2 shortening and 1/2 butter)
1     cup packed brown sugar
¼    cup mild-flavor molasses or full-flavor molasses
1     egg
2 ¼ cups Gold Medal® all-purpose flour
2     teaspoons baking soda
1     teaspoon ground cinnamon
1     teaspoon ground ginger (I only had crystallized ginger so I used nutmeg)
½    teaspoon ground cloves
¼    teaspoon salt
Granulated sugar


Mix shortening, brown sugar, molasses and egg thoroughly in large bowl. Stir in remaining ingredients except granulated sugar. Cover and refrigerate at least 2 hours.
Heat oven to 375°F. Grease cookie sheet. Shape dough into 1 1/4-inch balls. Dip tops in granulated sugar. Place balls, sugared sides up, 3 inches apart on cookie sheet. Sprinkle each with 2 or 3 drops of water.
Bake 10 to 12 minutes or just until set but not hard. Remove from cookie sheet to wire rack.



Readers, have a restful Sunday and take some time to have tea and cookies...you deserve them!  Oh, and here is a book recommendation:
The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

31 comments:

  1. They sound very yummy but I have never seen molasses in an Australian supermarket - perhaps it is like golden syrup or treacle and I am also a little unsure about shortening too - is this margarine ? Have a cozy day warm day.

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    1. Janine, yes, molasses and treacle are the same I believe. Shortening is vegetable fat which is solid at room temp. and used in baking cakes and pie crusts. Margarine is a substitute for shortening.

      Let me know if you make these with treacle or golden syrup and if you like them. :-)

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  2. One of my favorite favorite childhood cookies were Molasses Crinkles. I made them for my kids and they love them too. I think my recipe is pretty much the same as yours, though I'd have to look it up to make sure. :)

    It sounds like you are having so much fun. Enjoy!

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    1. I think the original was from the Betty Crocker cookbook. and as for fun, yes...but real life with its complications and worries continues in the background. Hence the cookies, I think.

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  3. your cookies sound interesting will have to check it out enjoy your Sunday

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  4. These sound yummy! and I would probably try them out with treacle too...:) Thanks for the recipe!

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  5. Oh yes, I remember those addictive cookies, one of my favorites along with peanut butter cookies. Can't wait to see some photos of the jacket!
    Have a good Sunday yourself, although it will be anything but quiet here with the upcoming NFL play-off games today. Might sneak a quick ride in this morning though,
    weather or not.

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    1. A short ride is on my agenda today also. Yesterday I played tag with Woodrow and damn, he always wins. :-)

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  6. Tea and cookies sound delightful:) Perhaps I will squeeze in a batch this afternoon after my sewing and before my workout, or should it be the other way around?

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    1. One cookie before and one after. Or two.

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  7. Love the cover of your book recommendation. Inspiring.

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  8. Congrats on starting your Minoru! I finished putting together my muslin over the weekend and I was delighted with how easy it was to put together.

    We never made actual food in my home ec classes. I remember making "pizzas" using english muffins, canned tomato sauce, and pre-shredded cheese. Your home ec sounds a lot better than mine!

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    1. yeah, it was in the "olden" days! Did you add the collar and facings to your jacket muslin? I am surprised that the facings go on over the finished edge of the collar. Did I screw up?

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  9. Mmm, that recipe sounds a lot like the gingerbread recipe I use, except it doesn't have the granulated sugar on the outside. Which sounds yum. Looking forward to seeing the results of your sewing. And thanks for the book recommendation. I really want to get back into reading more novels. (Apart from chapters of Harry Potter, aloud.) I've read one Julian Barnes before but quite some years ago.

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    1. Harry Potter must be fun to read aloud. I envy you that time. But, do be sure to try the novel I mentioned-it's very good and really thought provoking.

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  10. Must try these cookies! We certainly didn't make anything this good in home ec. I distinctly remember oatmeal porridge with skim milk made from powder - I refused to eat it!

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    1. Porridge with powdered skim milk!? That is cruel and unusual punishment, especially for young students learning to cook. I think I'll have to post some more recipes from 1966 or so.

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  11. I like Earl Grey tea and I LOVE molasses, so these sound really yummy.
    Thank for your help and encouragement with the sew along button, I have it working now, yea!

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  12. MMM, those cookies sounds delightful, I love molasses cookies, too! And tea...ah. I don't drink too much real tea anymore as caffeine disagrees with me, but I sure do enjoy special teas like earl grey once in a while.
    I think it is so great that you still have your recipe's from middle school home-ec, cool!

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  13. thanks Aroura...I'm going to post some others also. No caffeine? yikes!

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  14. I love that you are going for seductive! Go you!!!

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    1. ha..not yet though. I finished the tunic and reviewed it but it's too darn cold for just a cami underneath. Soon, though. :-)

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  15. I'll try them. I have earl grey tea everyday. Now I have an excuse to bake. ;)

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    1. They are totally spicey and yummy right out of the oven.

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  16. Tribal print. Seductive. Tunic. Where are the pics? But thanks for not posting pics of the baking so I don't drool all over my keyboard!!

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    1. Hi!! um, I did a review over at PatternReview, but I try to separate blogging from PR. So, in a few days, I'll post a pic and discuss style choices for casual clothing.

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  17. Can't wait to see what you come up with next week. In the mean time maybe I'll try your recipe!

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  18. Hi Mary! In reply to your question, i don't know if it is "better" to dye the fabric or the finished garment, it would depend on the individual fabric or garment. In the case of my skirt, I wanted all the different fabrics to be dyed together and to also aim for that overdyed look, so dyed the finished garment.
    Over-dyeing can lead to an uneven dye job if a person hasn't done it much before. Alternatively it can be more difficult to dye a large piece of fabric, a garment is smaller and so easier to handle.

    Re your book recommendation, out bookclub read that book and were all left with different interpretations of the "true" state of affairs. An obvious theme is how our memories can be completely altered by the passing of time. Ultimately however the book left us with more questions than answers.

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